Maths

Education

Sharing news and articles about different ways to educate children and adults alike throughout the world!

Finland is starting to teach by "topic" instead of "subject". That basically means the class is confronted with a problem and has to summon knowledge and skills from different fields to address it. I'll make sure to keep an eye on it to see how it unfolds!

http://www.sciencealert.com/no-more-phy…l-subjects

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No more physics and maths, Finland to stop teaching individual subjects
http://www.sciencealert.com
4 people like this.
Leo Sammallahti
Leo Sammallahti

I am from Finland, and I think there is only one school that is experimenting with this, although the international media inaccurately reports that the whole counry has or will shift to use the method. I think it should be evaluated with randomized controlled trials first. What could those randomized trials look like?

Is it possible for a computer to accurately measure a student's learning? Come to think of it, it is possible for a human to accurately measure a student's learning?

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg2…gyoulearn/

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Hate exams? Now a computer can grade you by watching you learn
https://www.newscientist.com
7 people like this.
Gregory York
Gregory York

I think a computer would be better at measuring learning than a human. It's like driverless cars. They make better decisions because they lack bias. A human would still make a better teacher, but I'd take a computer grading me any day.

Luc Pelletier
Luc Pelletier

I like the way you put it. At first, the idea of being evaluated by a computer felt disturbing, but then I thought about human bias... It's increasingly difficult to evaluate one's skills properly as the skills we develop are ever more abstract. I think computers and humans face the same challenges, that is to find proper criterias to base our evaluation on. Computers won't make mistakes as humans do, but you still have to program them according to human biases... Say, you have a driverless car and it's going to have an accident, and it has the choice between going offroad and killing it's passenger or going on the other side and killing a driver in another car. How should the computer decide what to do? Even the computer will be facing a dilemma in that case. I don't know if we can truly get rid of those biases, especially in evaluating other people's skills. I do wonder, for example, how a computer would deal with an answer or a project that is quite creative and goes astray from the formal instructions, but remain excellent nonetheless.
Or, then again, how would a computer take in account external factors that have an influence on one's performance on a test (special conditions, sickness, traumas, mortality in the family, etc.). I'm sure there's a way to do it, but we need to think about it. It's a great topic!

Happy about the creation of this new group! I shall have the honor of sharing the first article! :-)

There are many ideas in this article and I'd like people from all around the world to discuss the principles of their public education system.

Good day to all!

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-net…turnaround

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What can we learn from the great German school turnaround?
http://www.theguardian.com
3 people like this.